CNPS Happenings– December 2020

Stay Updated:

www.northcoastcnps.org 

https://www.facebook.com/NorthCoastCNPS/

CNPS welcomes anyone interested in native plants to join our events.  No expertise required.

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Evening Programs

December 9, Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. via Zoom.  Three in One Evening.   Madeleine Lopez, Humboldt State University graduate student, will tell about her current experiment investigating the role of fire-related cues in seed germination for the rare California endangered plant, the Lassics LupineTony LaBanca will take us virtually to see spring in southeastern Humboldt County, on the Wildflower Show collecting-route he has done for many years.  Sydney Larson will show the intriguing, non-green, flowering plants (known as mycoheterotrophs, previously saprophytes) she found on the Hope Creek Trail in June.  Register for this Zoom event on our chapter website www.northcoastcnps.org.  

January 13, Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. via Zoom. Topic to be announced. 

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Field Trips

December 6, Sunday. Samoa Dunes and Wetlands Day Hike.  We will explore dune forest, dune hollows, and dune mat on this large, beautiful, new addition to conservation lands on the North Spit of Humboldt Bay, walking about 3 miles, all on sand.  Bring lunch and water; dress for the weather!  Our Covid protocol insists on small groups, face coverings, and social distancing.  Register with Carol at 707-822-2015 or theralphs@humboldt1.com to learn details.

January 16, Saturday. Destination to be announced. 

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Native Plants for Sale 

Our native plants are available every day, 12-6 p.m., at the Kneeland Glen Farm Stand at Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave.  If you don’t see what you want, contact us at northcoastcnps@gmail.com.  

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One way to save native plants by Carol Ralph

Reading reports is not a fun way to save native plants, but it can have a big impact. This image from an “initial study”, a lengthy public document submitted to the county planning department, by an applicant to grow cannabis on a remote mountain property shows the location of three of the sixteen proposed greenhouses, which are scattered among five small coastal prairies on the forested mountains.  This prairie includes a “sensitive natural community” (S3), small enough it does not require avoidance. Though distressing to me, this situation is permitted by land use regulations. Nearby in the report, I learned that the botanical surveys were not done at seasons when some important plants would be visible, and the method used to calculate the cannabis percent of prime ag land was suspect.  These are faults I can call to the attention of the planning commission as part of the public comment required by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).  Reading just part of the report, I can find the information relevant to native plants and write a letter pointing out deficiencies.  I am still learning how to do this.  If you could too, get in touch!  There are lots of applications!

 

   

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