CNPS Happenings– March 2021

 

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www.northcoastcnps.org 

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CNPS welcomes anyone interested in native plants to join our events.  No expertise required.

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Evening Program

May 12, Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. “Serpentine Ecology: Wacky soils build glorious places.”  Where mantle rocks are found on the earth’s surface, you will also find exquisite landscapes, red rocks, and rare plants. Serpentine ecology is the science that describes the interactions between mantle-derived soils  (serpentine/ultramafic soils) and plants and animals. In the Klamath-Siskiyous, we are lucky to have significant “wacky soils.” Kristi Mergenthaler will lead a broad discussion while also highlighting some of the special places and plants in Oregon’s portion of the Klamath-Siskiyous. Kristi is a botanist, the stewardship director of Southern Oregon Land Conservancy, and a long-term volunteer with the Siskiyou Chapter Native Plant Society of Oregon.  Register for this Zoom event on our website. 

Mouse-ears, a monkeyflower on serpentine. By K. Mergenthaler

 

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Field Trip 

May 14-17, Friday-Monday. North Fork Smith Overnight Field Trip.  Extraordinary botanizing in the serpentine mountains at the edge of the North Fork Smith River Botanical Area of Six Rivers National Forest awaits us.  Our base camp will be at a rustic, off-the-grid, B & B cabin 3 hrs from Eureka, with lots of room for tents.  Group size may be limited for overnighting.  Day trip option is possible.  Register with Carol at 707-822-2015 or theralphs@humboldt1.com to learn more.    

 

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Where to See Serpentine  by Carol Ralph

This month’s speaker, and speakers at our recent Wildflower Show, extolled the beauty and uniqueness of serpentine soils and their flora. We are lucky to have good examples in our nearby mountains, stewarded by the Six Rivers National Forest.  From Eureka the closest place to see serpentine habitat is east on Highway 299 to Berry Summit, then south on Titlow Hill Rd.  Shortly after greengray rocks and Jeffrey Pines announce your arrival in serpentine, a sign announces the Horse Mountain Botanical Area.  At a wide intersection with a kiosk and free-form parking, walking in the forest or down the old mine road is easy.  Driving to the left further uphill you find Indian Butte Rd (6N18) on the left, a level, wide walk through dry, west-facing serpentine, then damp, north-facing serpentine, and eventually through Douglas-fir on non-serpentine.  Driving farther, you find a saddle at which to park while walking on old mining roads down the east side, or to turn up to the radio towers at the summit.  Vistas abound in this landscape dominated by geology and studded with unfamiliar plants.  

On the east side of Horse Mt.  By Ann Wallace

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Missed the Plant Sale?

Our native plants are available every day, 12 noon-6 p.m., at the Kneeland Glen Farm Stand at Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave.  If you don’t see what you want, contact us at northcoastcnps@gmail.com.

 

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