CNPS Happenings – November 2021

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Evening Program

November 10, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. “Our Treasured Coastal Prairies, Ecology and Maintenance”. Despite their small size, coastal prairies host great diversity of plants and wildlife, including pollinators, and sequester significant carbon.  Justin Luong, graduate student and a director of the California Native Grassland Association, will show examples of prairies and their flora and enumerate the many threats to them.  He will report on 36 coastal prairie restoration efforts he has surveyed.  Register for this Zoom presentation on our website.

A native bunchgrass blooms in a mix of coastal prairie and scrub. 

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Field Trip

November 6, Saturday. 9 a.m. Burned Forest Day Trip.  The desired destination (to be decided) is a road or trail within an hour of Arcata that goes through terrain burned in the Knob or Monument Fire of this year.  With a combination of driving and walking we will see the ashes, the black snags, the sprouting shrubs, the unburned patches, and surely some surprises.  If no such place is accessible, we will hike in the spruce forest, coastal prairie, and rocky outcrops of Sue-meg (formerly Patrick’s Point) State Park.  Meet at 9 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata).  Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water.  Contact Carol at 707-822-2015 or theralphs@humboldt1.com for the final plans.

 

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Native Plants for the Garden

Our nursery-grown native plants are for sale every day, 12-6 p.m. at the Kneeland Glen Farmstand at Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka.  If you don’t see what you want, contact us at northcoastcnps@gmail.com.  

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Gardens to Visit

by Carol Ralph

“What would native plants look like in my garden?”  This is a reasonable question from a person who has been inspired by Douglas Tallamy and now wants to make a wildlife-friendly garden by planting native plants.  The answer is at hand by visiting gardens listed on the “Gardens to Visit” page of our website, under the Gardening tab.  These are public and residential native plant gardens viewable anytime.  Some use only local natives; others use species native to anywhere in California.  Many mix native and non-native species.  Custom advice about a garden is available through our free Native Plant Consultation Service (details under “Gardening with Natives” on our website) or using Calscape.  Native plants are for sale at our twice-yearly native plant sales, the Kneeland Glen Farmstand, Lost Foods Nursery, Samara Restoration Nursery, and some broad-range nurseries.

A young native plant garden in spring. By Marnin Robbins