CNPS Happenings — Oct. 2021

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www.northcoastcnps.org 

https://www.facebook.com/NorthCoastCNPS/

CNPS welcomes everyone.  No expertise required.

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Evening Program  

October 13, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m.  “Marvelous Mycoheterotrophs: The Beauty and Science of Floral-Fungal Freeloaders.”  If you’ve ever been fascinated by a waxy, alien looking plant, you may have been enchanted by a marvelous mycoheterotroph! Mycologist and teacher Leah Bendlin of Oregon Mycological Society will discuss how these strange-looking plants depend upon fungi and how we know it.  She will also introduce some local species and tell how they might help in successful mushroom hunting! Register for this Zoom presentation on our website.

GhostPipes (Monotropa uniflora) . By LeahBendlin.

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Field Trip.

October 3, Sunday. Horse Mountain Day Hike. Indian Butte Road has both serpentine and “normal” soils, rocky outcrops, a seep, and a wet ditch. Conifers, manzanitas, ceanothuses, and succulents are guaranteed.  We will make a loop up the old ski slope past the radio towers on the summit.  Meet at 9 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata).  Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water.  Contact Carol at 707-822-2015 or theralphs@humboldt1.com.  

 

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Missed the Plant Sale?

Our plants are available every day, 12-6 p.m. at the Kneeland Glen Farmstand at Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka.  If you don’t see what you want, contact us at northcoastcnps@gmail.com.  

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Important Plant Areas   

by Carol Ralph

California is losing biodiversity now. Mapping the plant places we most need to save is urgent and crucial to the conservation of California’s botanical heritage. State CNPS is building the first comprehensive map of these Important Plant Areas (IPAs). The criteria include measures of rare plants, rare natural communities, plant diversity, soils, ethnobotanical importance, and other botanically significant traits.  The project collects data from a multitude of sources, such as herbaria, rare plant records, and personal lists, into an arcGIS map with many “layers” for the different criteria.  The data then goes into a mathematical model producing a “heat map” of the area, with higher conservation value shown in warmer colors.  People planning developments, like wind farms or cannabis farms, can avoid areas of high conservation value.  Land managers, like the U.S. Forest Service, State Parks, or land trusts, will see places they need to conserve and maintain, for example with weeding, grazing, or burning.  Watchdog organizations and citizens will see the same information.  

The value of this map depends on us telling the model about places like the rich, old growth stand at Groves Prairie, the spectacular lupines on Bald Hills Rd., and the genetically diverse Western Azaleas on Stagecoach Hill.  If you can contribute or help enter observations, please contact Tony (tlabanca@sbcglobal.net). Find out more at https://www.cnps.org/conservation/important-plant-areas