The Moon Snail: Conqueror of Clams Pt. 2

🐾Creature Feature🐾Back by popular demand, our friend the Moon Snail! The video you see here is a timelapse of a Moon Snail emerging from its hole in the sand. Similar to most other marine snails, the moon snail has a muscular foot that is used not only to glide on top of the sediment but also plow below the surface. This fleshy foot can also do something that most other snail's can't, it fills with water to expand covering it's large bulbous shell. The moon snail can live up to an impressive 15 years which can be attributed to their lifestyles as voracious predators and that they're quick to protect themselves against predation. When they sense danger or are disturbed, they withdraw the inflated foot into their shell and seal the opening with something called an operculum (basically a hardened door) so that their vulnerable fleshy foot is fully protected. These goopy slow moving friends are quite the site to behold in the intertidal habitat. Visit last week's creature feature post to learn more about the Moon Snail. #moonsnail #creaturefeature #oceanconservation #timelapse #northcoastenvironmentalcenter #intertidal

Posted by Northcoast Environmental Center on Tuesday, June 23, 2020

🐾Creature Feature🐾

Back by popular demand, our friend the Moon Snail! The video you see here is a timelapse of a Moon Snail emerging from its hole in the sand. Similar to most other marine snails, the moon snail has a muscular foot that is used not only to glide on top of the sediment but also plow below the surface. This fleshy foot can also do something that most other snail’s can’t, it fills with water to expand covering it’s large bulbous shell.

The moon snail can live up to an impressive 15 years which can be attributed to their lifestyles as voracious predators and that they’re quick to protect themselves against predation. When they sense danger or are disturbed, they withdraw the inflated foot into their shell and seal the opening with something called an operculum (basically a hardened door) so that their vulnerable fleshy foot is fully protected.

These goopy slow moving friends are quite the site to behold in the intertidal habitat. Visit last week’s creature feature post to learn more about the Moon Snail.